Start Here | Prevention | Treatment | Recovery

Go Figure .....

The Institute of Medicine and National Research Council’s Preventing Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Disorders Among Young People report – 2009 stated a $1 investment in early prevention and treatment yields $2 to $10 savings in health costs, criminal and juvenile justice costs, educational costs, and lost productivity. (SAMHSA, 2014)


School District Prevention Planning


Prevention Curriculum

We encourage and support schools in the process of making prevention a year-round, naturally embedded part of school culture by providing:

  • guidance choosing evidence-based, age-appropriate, and culturally competent prevention curriculum
  • assistance purchasing curriculum and materials
  • facilitator certification training in the curriculum 

Prevention curriculum can be found on the National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices  NREPP. This is an online database for educators, school counselors, social workers, family therapists, and crisis counselors. This site outlines pricing and performance for over 400 curriculum, and resources to support the selection, adoption, implementation, and evaluation of programs.  Need help choosing a curriculum?  Call us.


School Surveys Measuring Behaviors

We provide assistance to administer the Youth Risk Behavior Survey for students in grades 9-12, to measure current trending behaviors an to identify where prevention efforts should be focused. 2015 Results:
http://education.nh.gov/instruction/school_health/hiv_data.htm

The Teen Assessment Project (TAP) survey for students in grades 6-8 provides data to schools, districts, and the state around identified behaviors and substances to address.  Results of the 2016 survey given in the Monadnock region, can be found here 2016 TAP


Modify Policies & Procedures

We encourage more supportive, less punitive policies and procedures for drug and alcohol related issues. We guide interventions and brief assessments and referrals to services because each issue may also be a critical point of intervention.  

Supportive Policies may include:

  • less out-of school suspension time
  • meetings with parents within 24 hours of a violation
  • reintegration recovery supports post-treatment
  • allow kids to attend support meetings during the day
  • allow kids to make up missed work
  • screening brief intervention and referrals to treatment

Staff Training and Development 

We know if students are not "present" due to any variety of issues, they perform poorly personally and academically.  We offer training to improve understanding and skill sets in responding to the more challenging needs of our current student population including:

  • Brief Assessments & Treatment Referrals
  • Identifying Suicidal Ideation
  • Suicide Post-vention
  • Youth and Adult Mental Health First Aid
  • Using Trauma-Informed Best Practices
  • Motivational Interviewing
  • Post-treatment Student Reintegration
  • Supporting Families of Veterans
  • Critical Incident Response  
  • LGBTQ Groups
  • Prevention Ethics
  • Supporting Families of Veterans
  • Adverse Childhood Experiences

*If there is a topic you would like to see,  just ask.


Transition Workshops 

Reality Check provides transition workshops to prepare students and parents for the culture in a new school:

  • from elementary to middle school
  • from middle school to high school
  • from high school to college and beyond

Workshops outline what parents can expect in the new year, how to better provide extra support, and how to identify possible use and spot red flags.  


Youth Campaigns and Opportunities

We provide access to a variety of youth activities including:

  • Youth Leadership Academy (summer program)
  • Police and Rescue Personnel apprentice programs
  • 4-H Monadnock Robotics (all year)
  • Student Ambassador programs (school year)
  • Community service opportunities and Volunteerism
  • Business Internships
  • After school option with character building components

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Community Prevention Plan

Every part of a community plays an essential role in preventing drug use.  Many communities don't believe they have a problem, while others have prevention deeply embedded into their culture. 

Step 1 - assess a community's level of readiness to act.  

Step 2 -  identify assets and strengths, gaps, and which substances are priority to be addressed.  Then identify available resources (people and money) and other efforts currently happening to reduce duplication. 

Step 3 -  build social capacity and secure the resources needed to move forward with prevention plan development.

Step 4 - An 12-month Action Plan is developed to address identified priorities and includes strategies to implement:  

  • Provide Information — Educational presentations, workshops, seminars, articles, press releases, data, or media presentations
  • Enhance Skills — Online or in-person training or workshops designed to increase the skills of participants, members and staff, and supports to improve educational attainment
  • Provide Support — Creating support groups for individuals and families of people with various addictive behaviors  
  • Enhance Access & Reducing Barriers — Improving access to get treatment, providing recovery supports to reduce relapse
  • Change Consequence — Increasing alcohol or tobacco taxes can help decrease underage purchases and use
  • Change Physical Design — Changing the physical design (environment) can reduce use, like installing cameras or cleaning up parks and adding lighting  
  • Modify & Changing Policies — These formal changes in written procedures, policies, or laws are very effective in reducing negative behavior like implementing no smoking within 25 feet of buildings, or providing financial incentives for quitting smoking.

Plans are guided by two essential elements:

1.   Sustainability meaning prevention activities will be sustained long-term by the community itself and will become community-owned.

2.  Cultural Competence meaning activities being implemented are culturally appropriate for the community they take place in, and prevention becomes embedded into the community culture.

Step 5 - Each year the plan is evaluated and updated to address any newly identified priorities. 

Our goal is to have each community collectively make an impact. Communities become responsible for their own successes, ensuring long-term sustainability and a solid, secure future for its youth and young adults.


October 2016, Reality Check received a White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, Drug-Free Communities 5-year grant enabling us to offer prevention initiatives and build collaborative partnerships in the Jaffrey-Rindge and Con-Val School Districts, serving almost 4,000 students and over 30,000 NH residents in 11 zip codes.

 

Mayo Clinic - How to Talk About Suicide

2016 School Survey Results on risky behaviors: Teen Assessment Project

Our very own Ella and Joanna Burt volunteering at the Drug Epidemic Response Forum!

Our very own Ella and Joanna Burt volunteering at the Drug Epidemic Response Forum!

Calling All Parents.....

Talk with your kids about the risks
of using alcohol, illegal drugs, and medicine not prescribed to them.
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Your child’s brain is still developing until age 25. The earlier a young person starts using drugs or alcohol, the more likely to develop addiction.
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Work together to develop consequences for breaking rules. If they break rules, enforce the consequences.
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Make it clear to never take or share medicine that is not prescribed to them.   .....................................................

Be involved! Go to after-school activities, have dinner together, and meet their teachers.
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When your kids aren’t home, make sure you know where they are and who they’re with by talking to other parents.
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Know the signs of use and mental health issues like depression and anxiety. Get help if you think your child may be struggling. Start with your school nurse and doctor.
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Be a good role model. Kids who see their parents drunk, use drugs, or abuse medications are more likely to develop their own substance problems. 
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Try to manage stress by exercising, talking to a friend or therapist, watching something funny, or playing a game.
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Don’t give up. You still make a difference in their future choices. Regroup, talk to other parents, get some help and keep trying. Your kids are worth it.


Are you raising healthy kids? – A nationally recognized assessment for parents.

Emerging trends in drug use – Updated frequently with new developments in substance abuse.

Parental drug talk kit – Tips for talking and what to say to prevent drug abuse among kids & teens.

NIDA for Parents – Educational information and tips for keeping your kids drug-free.

NIDA for Teens – The science behind drug abuse.

Alcoholics Anonymous for Teens – Teens or parents of teens dealing with alcohol abuse can receive free, private help.


Want To Become a Certified Prevention Specialist?

Reality Check will help pay for training to get certified. *good for two years. 
Prevention Certification Board of New Hampshire
PO Box 1088
Manchester, NH
nhpreventcert.org  

Visit IC & RC Credentialing  http://www.internationalcredentialing.org/cred101

Download the Certified Prevention Specialist Matrix at CFEx: Addressing Alcohol and Drug Misuse

More training: NH Training Institute on Addictive Disorders .

Resources:

U.S. Department of Education
Catalog of Exemplary and Promising, Safe, Disciplined and Drug-Free Schools Programs.

Office of Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Prevention
Program guides of evidence-based prevention programs for youth  

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Preventing drug use and abuse among youth, teens, and young adults

NH Governor's Commission on Alcohol & Drug Abuse Prevention, Intervention & Treatment
105 Pleasant Street, 3rd FLR
North Concord, NH
www.dhhs.nh.gov/dcbcs/bdas/commission.htm

New Futures
10 Ferry Street, Suite 307
Concord, NH 03301
www.new-futures.org/

Enforcement of Underage Drinking Laws
NH Dept. of Justice
33 Capitol Street
Concord, NH 03301

 NH Teen Institute 
112 West Pearl Street
Nashua, NH 03060
www.nhteeninstitute.org/

NH Tobacco Helpline  1-800-QUIT-NOW)
Text QUITNOW to 22122
www.TryToStopNH.org

Partnership for A Drug-Free NH 10 Ferry Street
Concord, NH 03301
www.drugfreenh.org
www.checkthestats.org